Tuesday, 21 November 2017

UN in your language

Free and Equal Stamp Launch

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08.02.2016 - On 5 February 2016, the United Nations Postal Administration (UNPA) unveiled a set of six commemorative stamps to promote the UN Free & Equal campaign for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) equality.

The new stamps designed by Sergio Baradat, celebrate the diversity of the LGBTI community, and mark the first time that the UNPA has issued stamps with an LGBTI theme.

Launched on 26th July 2013, in Cape Town, South Africa by the UN Human Rights Office, Free & Equal is a global public education campaign dedicated to raising awareness of homophobic and transphobic violence and discrimination globally. The campaign has engaged millions of people in an effort to promote the fair treatment of LGBTI people and generate support for measures to protect their rights.

People who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex often suffer from social stigma, exclusion, and bias. Individuals may be fired from their jobs, bullied at school, denied appropriate medical treatment, thrown out of their homes, disowned by their parents, forced into psychiatric institutions, forced to marry or become pregnant, and subjected to attacks on their reputation.

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FAQs

What does “LGBTI” mean?

LGBTI stands for “lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex.” LGBTI people of all ages and in all regions of the world suffer from violations of their human rights. In the most severe instances, they are physically attacked, kidnapped, raped and murdered.

What does transgender mean?

Transgender (sometimes shortened to “trans”) is an umbrella term used to describe a wide range of identities —including transsexual people, cross-dressers (sometimes referred to as “transvestites”), people who identify as third gender, and others whose appearance and characteristics are perceived as gender atypical. Transwomen identify as women but were classified as males when they were born. Transmen identify as men but were classified female when they were born.

What is intersex?

An intersex person is born with sexual anatomy, reproductive organs, and/or chromosome patterns that do not fit the typical definition of male or female. This may be apparent at birth or become so later in life. An intersex person may identify as male or female or as neither. Intersex status is not about sexual orientation or gender identity: intersex people experience the same range of sexual orientations and gender identities as non-intersex people.

Is it possible to change a person’s sexual orientation and gender identity?

No. A person’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity cannot be changed. What must change are the negative social attitudes that stigmatize LGBTI people and contribute to violence and discrimination against them. Attempts to change someone’s sexual orientation often involve human rights violations and can cause severe trauma. 

 

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UNRICs Related Links

· United Nations Free and Equal Campaign

· Free and Equal Stamps Online Store

· United Nations Postal Administration

· The United Nations Human Rights Office

· Sustainable Development Goals

Photo Credits

UN Photos 

08.02.2016 - On 5 February 2016, the United Nations Postal Administration (UNPA) unveiled a set of six commemorative stamps[AD1]  to promote the UN Free & Equal campaign for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) equality.

The new stamps designed by Sergio Baradat celebrate the diversity of the LGBTI community, and mark the first time that the UNPA[AD2]  has issued stamps with an LGBTI theme.

Launched on 26th July 2013, in Cape Town, South Africa by the UN Human Rights Office, Free & Equal [AD3] is a global public education campaign dedicated to raising awareness of homophobic and transphobic violence and discrimination globally. The campaign has engaged millions of people in an effort to promote the fair treatment of LGBTI people and generate support for measures to protect their rights.

People who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex often suffer from social stigma, exclusion, and bias. Individuals may be fired from their jobs, bullied at school, denied appropriate medical treatment, thrown out of their homes, disowned by their parents, forced into psychiatric institutions, forced to marry or become pregnant, and subjected to attacks on their reputation.

FAQs[AD4] 

What does “LGBTI” mean? [AD5] 

LGBTI stands for “lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex.” LGBTI people of all ages and in all regions of the world suffer from violations of their human rights. In the most severe instances, they are physically attacked, kidnapped, raped and murdered.

What does transgender mean? [AD6] 

Transgender (sometimes shortened to “trans”) is an umbrella term used to describe a wide range of identities —including transsexual people, cross-dressers (sometimes referred to as “transvestites”), people who identify as third gender, and others whose appearance and characteristics are perceived as gender atypical. Transwomen identify as women but were classified as males when they were born. Transmen identify as men but were classified female when they were born.

What is intersex? [AD7] 

An intersex person is born with sexual anatomy, reproductive organs, and/or chromosome patterns that do not fit the typical definition of male or female. This may be apparent at birth or become so later in life. An intersex person may identify as male or female or as neither. Intersex status is not about sexual orientation or gender identity: intersex people experience the same range of sexual orientations and gender identities as non-intersex people.

Is it possible to change a person’s sexual orientation and gender identity? [AD8] 

No. A person’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity cannot be changed. What must change are the negative social attitudes that stigmatize LGBT people and contribute to violence and discrimination against them. Attempts to change someone’s sexual orientation often involve human rights violations and can cause severe trauma.

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