Tuesday, 21 November 2017

UN in your language

Ciné-ONU: SPEED SISTERS

Cine ONU SPEED SISTERS

18.03.2016 – On 17 March, UNRIC presented a Ciné-ONU screening of SPEED SISTERS to more than 350 people at the Italian Cultural Institute in Brussels. 

SPEED SISTERS focuses on the first all-woman race car driving team in the Middle East. Following the friendships between the five women as they grab headlines and turn heads at improvised tracks across the West Bank, SPEED SISTERS is a glimpse into how these women have sped their way into the heart of the gritty, male-dominated Palestinian street car-racing scene in the face of military occupation.

Following the screening, Christophe Verhellen from UNRIC moderated a Q&A session featuring Vanina Ickx, professional Belgian racing car driver, Laurence Gillois from UN Women Brussels Office, and Avi Goldstein, SPEED SISTERS producer.

Although touching upon themes such as the occupation, women in sport and gender inequality, Avi Goldstein said that the film’s aim was simple: “we tried to tell a story about being yourself and living in difficult circumstances.  These themes are universal.”  He revealed that the success of the film in capturing the relationship between the women was a result of director Amber Fares spending years with the protagonists in the West Bank.

Laurence Gillois said of the main characters, “they are role models for me because of their resistance.  It is their power and energy in what they are doing; they fall, they get up and they become leaders.” Avi Goldstein added that “these women are not empowered, they are powerful.  Sometimes it just takes other people to move out of the way and recognise the power that that these women have.”

Vanina Ickx was moved by the film and said that she “felt small compared to the women in the film” and that there is a serious lack of female role models in sport and the wider world. Speaking of her own experiences of gender inequality which she experienced at all levels of the racing world, she affirmed “you have to keep fighting, in and out of the car, to be considered equal.  You have to work twice as hard.”

SPEED SISTERS speaks to the 2030 Agenda, in particular Sustainable Development Goal number 5, gender equality. Laurence Gillois highlighted UN Women’s ‘HeForShe’ campaign and asserted that the fight against gender inequality requires not only the involvement of women and girls but also men and boys.

____________________________________

UNRICs Related Links

· SPEED SISTERS Film 

· 'HeForShe' Campaign

· Sustainable Development Goals

Photo: UNRIC/Frederik Bordon  

18.03.2016 – On 17 March, UNRIC presented a Ciné-ONU screening of SPEED SISTERS to more than 350 people at the Italian Cultural Institute in Brussels

SPEED SISTERS focuses on the first all-woman race car driving team in the Middle East. Following the friendships between the five women as they grab headlines and turn heads at improvised tracks across the West Bank, SPEED SISTES is a glimpse into how these women have sped their way into the heart of the gritty, male-dominated Palestinian street car-racing scene in the face of military occupation.

Following the screening, Christophe Verhellen from UNRIC moderated a Q&A session featuring Vanina Ickx, professional Belgian racing car driver, Laurence Gillois from UN Women Brussels Office, and Avi Goldstein, SPEED SISTERS producer.

Although touching upon themes such as the occupation, women in sport and gender inequality, Avi Goldstein said that the film’s aim was simple: “we tried to tell a story about being yourself and living in difficult circumstances.  These themes are universal.”  He revealing that the success of film in capturing the relationship between the women was a result of director Amber Fares spending years with the protagonists in the West Bank.

Laurence Gillois said of the main characters, “they are role models for me because of their resistance.  It is their power and energy in what they are doing; they fall, they get up and they become leaders.” Avi Goldstein added that “these women are not empowered, they are powerful.  Sometimes it just takes other people to move out of the way and recognise the power that that these women have.”

Vanina Ickx was moved by the film and said that she “felt small compared to the women in the film” and that there is a serious lack of female role models in sport and the wider world. Speaking of her own experiences of gender inequality which she experienced at all levels of the racing world, she affirmed “you have to keep fighting, in and out of the car, to be considered equal.  You have to work twice as hard.”

SPEED SISTERS speaks to the 2030 Agenda, in particular Sustainable Development Goal number 5, gender equality [link]. Laurence Gillois highlighted UN Women’s ‘HeForShe’ campaign [link] and asserted that the fight against gender inequality requires not only the involvement of women and girls but also men and boys.

Social Media

Facebook R dark blue 150px  TwitterBird R dark blue 150px  Vimeo R dark blue 150px  Youtube R dark blue 150px  Instagram R dark blue 150px
>> All our channels

externallinks-icon120x120External link:

securitycouncilreport

infoPoint32x32 Dblue Latest Products:

New Backgrounders:
          Myanmar
          Refugees and Migrants
          Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs)
 

Library Newsletter - October 2017
(new websites, information material & publications)

UN Press & Media Contacts

externallinks-icon120x120External link (non-UN):

whatsinblue

When the Security Council approaches the final stage of negotiation of a draft resolution the text is printed in blue... What's in Blue helps interested UN readers keep up with what might soon be "in blue".